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CONSENT of the GOVERNED PROJECT

to change the county charter  and restore sovereignty to every citizen.

Recent quotes from three of our own county council members on their positions as elected officials are revealing as to how they view their proper roles : 

“it sometimes takes a law to change people's behavior”

 "Sometimes I have to be forced to do things that are right and I don't want to.”

 (I need) “to take charge, to lead our County, to define policy in the best interests of the people of our island. “

Frightening, isn't it !


Our county government lately has taken on 3 roles:

  • Administrative (such as determining how many police to hire, or where a road should go, or how to process garbage). This is an appropriate level of authority and responsibility for them to play.
  • Telling us what things we CAN NOT do i.e.:restricting our rights, more so every year
  • Taking our money: i.e.: taxes and fees

We the people have delegated out elected officials the power to be administrators, but we have NOT delegated them the power to restrict our lives and take our money without our permission.

The Consent of the Governed acts will restore forever this authority and sovereignty to the people of the Big Island.

 

 

IN PRESS
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Sunday
Jun022013

( JUNE 2013 ) E Hana Kākou : The Advancement of Native Hawaiians and All Residents of the Aloha State by Keli'i Akina PH.D.

Entire presentation video record here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bek8j0dEbTo&feature=youtu.be Dr AKina began with the moving aloha oli welcoming chant taught to him by his mentor Winona Beamer, emphasizing aloha for all. He then defined the biggest threat to all Hawaii, and all Hawaiians, as being the present threat of ending the aloha spirit of inclusiveness. Specifically he addressed the Akaka Bill as wanting to impose a government entity on Native Hawaiians similar to that of Native American Indians, which would establish government to government relations, but go around any chance of government to people relations. This was contrary to the spirit of the founding documents of America, the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Further, when the Akaka bill failed, the Hawaii State government recently passed a law determined to proceed on their own, the Native Hawaiian Roll Commission, which would define Hawaiians by blood lines since Captain Cook, a racially divisive mechanism that was contrary to the spirit of aloha. He contrasted this with the Kingdom of Hawaii’s Constitution of 1840, which was a declaration of rights stating equality for all : "God hath made of one blood all nations of men to dwell on the earth, in unity and blessedness”. This enlightened Hawaiian document, instituted by King Kamehaeha III, preceded the US own ending of racial inequality, the ending of slavery, by 2 decades.

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Tuesday
Nov132012

(Nov 12, 2012) 2nd Amendment Rights and the law; NRA President DAvid Keene

Link here is to the speech by David Keene, NRA president, from Hawaii Political Reporter KHPR.net

It follows a selected short segment from Ron Paul farewell speech to Congress :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJZCrgyW1qg&feature=plcp


Here also is a link to a very short (2 1/2 min) segment from Big Island Video News:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rAz9E0_02WM&feature=player_embedded

Monday
Jun272011

(JUNE 2011) Hawaii Government Impact: the High Cost of Land Use and Housing. David Turner, Prof. David CAllies

The June Forum for the Conservative Forum for Hawaii focused on Hawaii Government Impact: the High Cost of Land Use and Housing. Initial remarks were from President Walter Moe, an owner-builder consultant and former HPP Owners Association president on local building code requirements, followed by our featured speakers Big Island real estate broker David Turner on permitting and process problems, and UH law professor David Callies, author of the definitive work “Regulating Paradise” on law effects on housing in “the most regulated state in the nation”. “Ownership of private property is considered a constitutional civil right”, he stated, but “Hawaii and California are the only states in the nation where land use is regarded as a privilege to be bestowed by government” Mr. Moe opened with comments on how there are 4,800 Big Island families on the affordable housing waiting list, while the Hawaii County Office of Housing and Community Development signed a $34,000 consultant contract to study the mystery of why affordable housing is becoming less available. “We all know why affordable housing isn’t available. Government regulations are preventing it.”...

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Sunday
May222011

(May 2011) “Hawaii’s Public School System” PAtrick Walsh, HArvey tajiri, brian delima

We were honored to have 3 speakers for this event. Questions and answers followed the addresses. Patrick Walsh, former HPP Owners Assoc. president and Board of Education candidate 2008 whose platform emphasized decentralization, safety within the schools and accountability. Harvey Tajiri, former County Council Chair, State Representative, Univ. of Hawaii Regent, and upper division lecturer in the Political Science Department at UH Hilo Brian DeLima, former County Council Chair and newly appointed member State Board of Education Patrick Walsh spoke first, raising the question of was the issue of education one of individuals or structure or society that really made the difference? He related how he had been educated in a demanding and rigid system in Ireland, but he would not bring that back to Hawaii. His 6 children were educated in his home. “Not home schooled, but more ‘self-schooled’ ”. He provided each child with a laptop, and fostered a safe environment where they each could focus but without a rigid curriculum. They all had the capability to focus for extended periods of time, because they were motivated to do so. One son said, “play is the best education”, and “fear lowers intelligence”. 3 sons were now all excelling in their in university studies. He commented how if we could institutionalize that same safe and focused learning environment, the system would be improved. Harvey Tajirii spoke next, sharing his gut feelings about things he had felt for a long long time, based in part on events predating his experience in the legislature. He had a degree in education, and made the point that ‘education is about education, not self-esteem”. He had prepared a syllabus for his upper division political science class, but had to tear it up when he realized that the university students, juniors and seniors, did not know the difference between a governor and a mayor, nor the three branches of government. “They told me: congress, the legislature, and the senate.” He told them: “please don’t vote!” and was only half joking, but half serious too. They were unprepared for college from their high school education. “It’s not the students fault that they are not adequately educated”. He was educated in Kaumana School, where one teacher taught 2 grades, each with 25 students. Today, student: teacher ratios are much less, but results are worse. In his day, after 6th grade, every student could read the local paper. Today, many cannot do so after 12th grade. He knows this also from his business experience, where frequently applicants with high school diplomas could not complete the job application without assistance. “The system is broken, and the solution is simple: we must allow the teachers to teach.” “Do we as a society, a community, parents politicians, bureaucrats allow this to happen, or not?” He was very glad the Forum had given him the opportunity to bring this up for discussion, because “only you folks (the people) can do something about it.” Brian DeLima spoke next, accompanied by a slide presentation about the current Department of Education. The school system dated back to the days of King Kamehameha V, a time when many people could speak several languages. The school boards were appointed, and the quality of schooling was generally high. With statehood in 1960, elected school boards were part of the state constitution and continued until last year 2010 when the people voted a new constitutional amendment to return to an appointed school board. Why did they do so? Because most parents, teachers, politicians and taxpayers were very unhappy with the school system. The appointed board started only 6 weeks ago, and immediately sought to change the prevailing culture. They decreased their assigned staff from 11 to 3 (they were turned over to the superintendent of schools, their budget from $1.5 million to $300,000, they would meet 2 x monthly, and during business days to decrease overhead from travel and per diem expenses. In short, they were strictly focused on the business at hand. Their immediate goals were to focus on where the money was being spent, and an audit of policies. They wanted to transfer responsibilities to the schools. Now Act 51 was supposed to have done this already, so principals should be deciding who to hire and what to teach. However it was a general attitude by those who sought school changes that the culture of the Department of Education was not rigorous enough. He subscribed to that opinion.

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Monday
May022011

Rep. Charles Djou ( Mar, 2011) “Hawaii's Traditional 20th Century Politics: Risky for the 21st Century”

Charles Djou opened his talk by remarking that he was frequently asked what it meant to him to serve in Congress. He commented how remarkable it was the he, the child of two foreign emigrants, had been able to become a US Congressman. His father had fled the communists in China in 1949, and his mother had come from Thailand. On the very day that he was taking the oath of office, his relatives in Thailand were witnessing the smell of gunsmoke, the sight of blood in the streets and the sound of tank treads, as government troops fired on political demonstrators who had brought much of the commerce of Bangkok to a halt. That contrast was with him every day in office, and a constant reminder of the enormous privilege to have his position and the remarkable freedoms and opportunites that we enjoyed as Americans. However, despite the remarkable achievements of America, there were still many challenges that were present, and especially in Hawaii. Both the world and the USA have changed dramatically and very rapidly recently, but the political system in Hawaii has not kept pace.

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Friday
Mar042011

(FEB 2011) HAWAII’S RENEWABLE ENERGY MANDATES, and HOW IT AFFECTS EVERYONE. Michael Kaleikini: “Geothermal Energy in Hawaii” And Dr. Panos Prevedouros: “Statewide Implications of the Mandates”

FEBRUARY 2011 FORUM: HAWAII’S RENEWABLE ENERGY MANDATES, and HOW IT AFFECTS EVERYONE. We were honored to be addressed by two distinguished speakers: Michael Kaleikini, manager of Puna Geothermal Ventures, on “Geothermal Energy in Hawaii” And Dr. Panos Prevedouros, Professor of Civil Engineering at University of Hawaii, on “Statewide Implications of the Mandates”. Questions were entertained after both speakers concluded.

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Friday
Mar042011

Councilman Dominic Yagong (JAN 2011) 

Sunday
Dec052010

sen. sam slom (Nov, 2010) Election 2010: Bomb Damage Assessment / After Action Report & What the Future Will Bring

Sen. Sam Slom gave the November address to the Conservative Forum for Hawaii on “Election 2010: Bomb Damage Assessment / After Action Report & What the Future Will Bring”. Sam (his preferred choice of address: “Mr. Slom was my father”) has identified himself as a Conservative first and a Republican second. He viewed the disastrous 2010 Hawaii Republican losses as a ripple effect from the top of the ticket down, coupled with the perfect wave timing of rejection of Governor Linda Lingle and of extremely poor campaigning. “Just like so many hated Bush in 2008, many hated Lingle”, and that hurt Duke Aiona a lot too. The public service unions and social service sectors lead that wave of Lingle rejection. Sam felt Duke ran one of the worst campaigns possible. Instead of promoting the good things the Lingle administration had accomplished, and there were many, he “ran away every chance he got.” ”Lingle was the right governor for the right time, tough when that was needed.” However, Duke would duck away, trying to disassociate himself completely, which was both ineffective and appeared weak and disingenuous. His campaign neither addressed this concern of the public nor many others. This dissatisfaction rippled down to all the other political races as well.

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Tuesday
Oct192010

Ms Jamie Story (oct 2010) cutting the pork from the legislatures sacred cows

Ms. Jamie Story, president of the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, gave the October 2010 address to the Conservative Forum for Hawaii on “Cutting the Pork from the Legislature’s Sacred Cows”. Ms. Story reviewed how the mission of the Grassroot Institute to promote a more free and prosperous Hawaii had led them to several investigations of the state government. With the demise of one major local paper and 2 TV stations, there was a dearth of objective scrutiny of the government, but with their small but dedicated full-time staff they were actively on watch with their second annual Hawaii Pork Report, their “Trim the Fat” contest, their Legislative Report Card, their review of Honolulu “The Boat to No Where”, fiscal analysis for the Honolulu rail project, and many other projects. She set the tone with a quote from Ronald Reagan: “Government is not the solution to our problems, government IS the problem.” She proceeded with a litany of facts unveiled from their investigations this year:

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Sunday
Sep192010

Mrs. Linda Smith, (Sept 2010),The State Economy: how this administration managed the worst fiscal crises in state history without raising taxes”.

Ms. Linda Smith, Senior Policy Advisor to Governor Linda Lingle, gave the September address to the Conservative Forum for Hawaii on “The State Economy: how this administration managed the worst fiscal crises in state history without raising taxes”. Ms. Smith sketched out the ugly financial truth that slammed Hawaii in 2008, when the global financial crisis came home here. The State Council on Revenues was projecting a 2009 budget gap of $3 billion due to declining tax revenues, a huge blow when the annual operating budget was $5.2 billion. Not only that, they projected that 2008 revenues would remain depressed and not return to 2008 levels until at least 2012. The outlook was grim. She also mapped out in brief the last 10-year history of the state finances. From 1999 to 2009, the state revenues grew $1.76 billion. Where did all that money go? How come it wasn’t spent repairing and maintaining schools, and highways, and harbors and other needed projects? What happened to all that money? 78% of the increase went to cumulative collective bargaining agreements totaling $1.37 billion. In the last 10 years, only 22% of the increase in tax revenues to the state was spent on non-personnel areas.

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